Vitamin D3 to the Rescue!

It is known that vitamin D3 may help fortify the immune system but also supports bone density, reduces depression, provides relief from inflammatory bowel disease, and fight certain cancers.  We have now learned that low levels of vitamin D3 may contribute to infectious diseases such as covid-19.

There are two common types of vitamin+9n D.  D2, ergocalciferol, is derived from plants.  D3 is the biologically active form produced in humans and animals.  D2 raises vitamin D blood levels slower than D3.  Some experts say D3 is twice as effective as D2.  We recommend D3.

Vitamin D blood levels are lowest in the winter months due to lack of sunshine.  This corresponds with the flu season.  Since covid-19 is a corona virus do not be surprised if we see an uptick in infections during the winter months.

According to the president of the British Society for Ecological Medicine, by having a proper vitamin D status it would reduce the risk of covid-19 becoming severe by 90% and reduce your risk of dying by 96%.  Dr. Mercola recommends vitamin D levels of 60 to 80 ng/ml in order to reduce the risk of infection.  A minimum blood level of at least 30 ng/ml is needed for protection against covid-19.

We offer vitamin D3 in various forms, brands and doses.  Vitamin D3 is very affordable.  Since vitamin D3 is fat-soluble and its level in the body rises slowly, if you believe you are deficient consider taking a high dose for two weeks.  A high dose would be 5000iu to 10,000iu daily.  A maintenance dose is in the 1000iu to 3000iu range.  The only way to know your vitamin D3 level is to have it tested using the 25-Hydroxy Vitamin D test.  At-home vitamin D tests are available online or through your health care practitioner.  Please consult a Natural Living associate for assistance.  For more information, contact me at RickATgeorgetownmarket.com.

 

The information provided in this newsletter has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any disease. It is not a substitute for the advice of a qualified health care practitioner.

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