Cancer and the New Biology of Water ~ Part Three

In last month’s blog article, which was based on Thomas Cowan’s book, Cancer and the New Biology of Water, I discussed what Cowan believes contributes to the cause of cancer, why the progress in curing cancer has been so slow, and the five plant and mushroom medicines that have the potential to heal cancer. To read last month’s blog, go here.

If cancer is caused by the deterioration of the intracellular liquid gel (cytoplasm) of the cells, then how do you heal the cytoplasmic gels? Cowan suggests using the power of fever, hyperthermia, infrared saunas, or any warmth therapy. The herb mistletoe, through its stimulation of warmth in the human organism, has a history of contributing to healing cancer, but as stated previously, unfortunately it is not available in the US.  Mexico is the closest country where the Helixor mistletoe injection is available.  Hyperthermia, which is the process of warming targeted areas of the body to temperatures of 108 degrees or higher, is also not available in the US unless you agree to also do chemotherapy. Insane. That leaves sitting in an infrared sauna for 20 minutes or more at temperatures of 125 degrees or higher on a regular basis as the only warmth therapy available here.

Cowan believes it is important to balance mineral levels, and he discovered Celtic sea salt is a simple, safe, affordable way to do this. Did you know the mineral composition of human blood is identical to that found in the sea? Humans should be exposed to all the minerals that exist in similar proportions to those found in our blood or in the sea.  Chlorophyll is also nearly identical to human blood. Throw out your regular table salt and use only whole, real salt such as Celtic salt, Real Salt or Himalayan salt.

Should cancerous tumors be removed? It depends. If the tumor is small and near the surface of the skin, consider using black salve to draw it out. Please get professional guidance to do this. Cowan believes that surgically removing a tumor, followed by the suggested holistic therapies outlined in his book, produces the best outcome.

What you eat and drink once diagnosed is critical. A whole food, plant-based diet as outlined by the work of the Weston Price Foundation and Sally Fallon’s book Nourishing Traditions is a good resource. I also recommend Chris Wark’s book Chris Beat Cancer.   Include intermittent fasting, bone broth, fresh fruits and veggies, and fermented foods such as local sauerkraut. Cowan recommends drinking deuterium depleted water. A source is listed in his book. Your feedback is welcome.  Send your comments/questions to Rick at RickATgeorgetownmarket.com.

Share this post?

Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
Pinterest

Recent Posts

What is Organic?

From the USDA website, condensed by Harrison Moore, translated by Malachi Morris, Georgetown Market Staff WHAT IS ORGANIC? From the USDA website, condensed by Harrison

Read More »